Written by Thomas Herron

Valee

Valee, one of GOOD Music’s newest signees along with Sheck Wes, is a bit of an enigma. A New York Times article on the rapper highlights his lack of social media presence as well as his status as a modern day “Renaissance Man.”

 

Valee produces a lot of his own music and after the release of his first tape 1988, gained enough recognition from Kanye West to get signed. Following his signing, the Chicago rapper released GOOD Job, You Found Me, a six song EP.

 

The GOOD Music artist has an unusual sound that borders on new wave mixed with a sort of 90’s gangster rap. Though Valee is in fact a new rapper the similarities to the new generation lay almost solely in production.

 

His latest EP features label President Pusha T on “Miami,” one of the more attention worthy songs of his work. Valee isn’t to this point a great lyricist but that can change as his sound focuses on production and a slowed down take on trap music.

 

The rapper doesn’t limit himself to typical trap in the way that he doesn’t make reckless bangers, and instead uses steady production to compliment his monotone sound to make for an overall relaxed and more sophisticated take on the trap.

 

It’s still so early in Valee’s career that calling some parts of his music weaknesses would be inaccurate, simply because we haven’t seen him really try to do things like produce conscious or emotional music, or focus on lyricism. That isn’t to say he is incapable as he shows flashes of potential lyricism in regards to imagery on songs like “Cole Haan,” but it seems to be that producing an original and monotone but hard-hitting sound is of the highest importance to the Chicago native.

 

Valee’s focus on song-making as an art is made evident through his song length alone, with no song on his latest EP reaching a full three minutes.

 

Keep an eye out for Valee’s first full-length album and for the artist to grow in the near future because if Kanye saw something in his

Primetimejournal.com

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